Motion in UI Design

UI Design is not restricted to static display only. Motions helps designers improve user experience. The article “Motion in UX Design” explains why:

  • It drives user’s attention and hints at what will happen if a user completes a click/gesture.
  • It helps you orient users within the interface and provides guided focus between views.
  • It provides a visual feedback.

Check out the very good examples as well!

Expecting that people keep their learned behaviour

People learn a certain behaviour and stick to it. The advantage is that they do not need to consciously remember an action, but can act unconsciously, thus reducing cognitive strain.

Now what happens when a well-known UI is changed? People would need to adapt, but will stick to their learned behaviour at first. Like Little Big Details shows, Chrome moved the search field on new tabs but still allows to enter search terms when users tap on the empty area where the field was before.

It looks like an Easter Egg, but is actually a well-designed UI.

Information, Perception, Truth

What you see is NOT what you get!

This is somewhat obvious to most of us, but sometimes software product lead users in a “wrong” way. Users have a hard time reaching their goal. So we need to keep in mind the difference between presented information and perceived information, and that there may be more than one truth.

I would like to refer to the article “Information, Meaning, Perception & Truth

Reducing choice to increase focus

Decision fatigue is real: People can only make a certain amount of decisions. A good product is not necessarily the one providing most options in order to fulfil every need, but the one reducing complexity in order to make it easy to use.

It is has to build such a product, because there will always be someone complaining, but focus helps your users.

Designing for error

I didn’t post anything on human behaviour and its relationship to design lately. Here’s one more post with a small amount of slides that quickly summarizes the main points of “designing for error”. Every UX developer, designer and product manager should be aware that people make mistakes, and sometimes don’t even recognise them as mistakes.

Designing for error