Future with no apps

Donny Reynolds points out that apps on mobile phones have two major drawback: discoverability and delivery. Both aspects are possible setbacks to individual apps’ success and to the platform’s success as a whole.

The proposed solution is to provide streamed apps on demand.

But wait – isn’t that websites?

Hiring product managers for product management experience

There has been a discussion about whether to hire product managers that have product management experience or to hire product managers that explicitly do not have this experience. This article highlights the arguments in favour of PM experience:

  • Good (great) product managers bring a critical mix of technical talent, business insight and market/customer/user insight
  • Even startups have product experience, even if there is no dedicated PM role
  • Subject matter experts have no PM skills
  • Product management is harder than you might think
  • “A weekend at the dude ranch doesn’t make you a cowboy.”

Moving from early stage to growth stage

Yerrie Kim speaks about how to act as a product manager in the early stage of product development and how to act in the growth stage of product development. She highlights the dimensions Technology, Customers and Team.

There is pretty much insight in the speech, but the difficult thing would be to realise when to move on from early phase to growth phase. This is not a sudden change but rather an evolution.

Product Manager in the enterprise (Enterprise Survival Guide)

I recently wrote about product managers for enterprise product. Now it’s time to write about product managers IN an enterprise.

Things are pretty different in large enterprises compared to fast and small start-ups. You need to be patient, accept a much higher grade of complexity, and do some other things, as explained in the article Product Management Career Resilience.

Product Management for the Enterprise

Most of the many articles I link do not mention the difference between managing consumer products and enterprise products. There are, however, severe differences, mostly regarding

  • the business model
  • buyer of the product (in enterprises the buyer is usually not the user)
  • innovation (do NOT move fast and break things)

Read the article Product Manager for the Enterprise here.

Expecting that people keep their learned behaviour

People learn a certain behaviour and stick to it. The advantage is that they do not need to consciously remember an action, but can act unconsciously, thus reducing cognitive strain.

Now what happens when a well-known UI is changed? People would need to adapt, but will stick to their learned behaviour at first. Like Little Big Details shows, Chrome moved the search field on new tabs but still allows to enter search terms when users tap on the empty area where the field was before.

It looks like an Easter Egg, but is actually a well-designed UI.